Dive Watches for the world’s toughest conditions

 

High pressures. Low temperatures. Salt water. There is simply no activity that is harder on a watch than diving. And a diver’s safety depends on accurate timekeeping, ultimate legibility, and total reliability. When diving for sport gained popularity in the 1960s, few watch manufacturers were prepared to meet a diver’s needs. But IWC was there from the beginning, with the introduction of the Aquatimer in 1967.

One of IWC's latest dive watches in Ceratanium (Ref. IW379403)

Dive watches with an innovative history

 

IWC has a long and storied history of men’s dive watches. It all began with the rugged and reliable Aquatimer Reference 812. Its handsome steel case was watertight to 200 meters, and its rotating bezel was positioned under the glass for ultimate security. And that was only the beginning. In the decades that followed, IWC released one innovation after another, including the revolutionary titanium Porsche Design Ocean 2000 which was water-resistant to 2000 meters, the completely non-magnetic Reference 3519, and the mechanical depth gauge of the GST Deep One. And the innovation continues with the latest line of Aquatimer luxury dive watches.

 

To mark the 50th anniversary of its Aquatimer dive watches, IWC in September 2017 released a special edition with the first case made of Ceratanium®, a material as light and unbreakable as titanium, but also as hard and scratch-resistant as ceramic. The brand's material experts had developed this particular composite based on a titanium alloy for more than five years. The Aquatimer Perpetual Calendar Digital Date-Month Edition "50 Years Aquatimer" (Ref. IW379403) is equipped with the in-house  89802 Calibre and limited to just 50 pieces.

Underwater overachievers

 

Aquatimer Reference 816 AD

One year after the original Aquatimer, the Reference 816 was born. Of course it was highly water-resistant. But it also featured an eye-catching red dial, and its indexes and baton hands were inlaid with tritium for easy legibility even at the darkest depths.

 

The Ocean 2000 (Ref. 3500)

A celebrated design by F.A. Porsche, a revolutionary titanium case, and water-resistant to no less than 2000 meters, this icon cemented IWC’s reputation as a maker of the world’s best dive watches. How good was it? Good enough for mine clearance divers of the German Navy. Read more about an extraordinary collection of Ocean Bund watches.

 

Deep One (Ref. 3257) and Deep Two (Ref. 3547)

The GST Deep One diving watch was brought to life in 1999. Reference 3527 featured a mechanical depth gauge, which was the result of an incredibly clever design and relentless engineering. Ten years later it was followed by the Aquatimer Deep Two, Reference 3547, which was even more water-resistant, and gained the ability to record maximum depth reached during a dive.

The first IWC dive watch, Ref. 812 AD from 1967
IWC Diver's Watch dedicated to  Jacques-Yves Cousteau (Ref. IW376805)

Protecting what we love

 

At IWC, the principle of sustainability is one of our top priorities, which is why we are so proud to support two organisations devoted to protecting the oceans we hold so dear.

 

IWC has been working with the Charles Darwin Foundation since 2009. Established in 1959, this international non-profit organisation is devoted to safeguarding the flora and fauna of the Galapagos Islands. Several special editions of the IWC Aquatimer have been created to draw attention to CDF and these natural treasures of the Pacific.

 

The Cousteau Society continues the work of the legendary Jacques Cousteau, and is committed to marine life around the world. IWC has been involved with The Cousteau Society since 2004 in a variety of ways, including supporting the Cousteau Label, an award for coastal communities that engage in harmonious development with nature, and sponsoring a research expedition to the Red Sea aimed at providing further insight into the state of its coral reefs.

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